30 March 2007

Hiking in Sleeping Giant Park

Route on Google Maps
Extra Data on the route: Just Climbing Down [kml], ERockClimbing-HighPoints.jpg, DipInMiddle-After1stHighPt.jpg, Overview.jpg

Stats on the Hike
Spreadsheet
HeartRate-Elev-Profile.jpg


Absolute-from-start delta-vs-previous-step


Time Dist (mi) Elev (ft) Time Dist (mi) Elev (ft) Lat. (dd) Long. (dd)
Start 0:00:00 0 89


41.4216 -72.89847
1st-top 0:33:59 1.44 713 0:33:59 1.44 624 41.42608 -72.89899
Middle-dip 0:57:21 2.05 467 0:23:22 0.61 -246 41.42832 -72.89726
2nd-top 1:21:16 3.03 814 0:23:55 0.98 347 41.43053 -72.89052
Leave-top 1:23:55 3.13 707


41.43044 -72.89068
End 1:48:57 4.62 182 0:25:02 1.49 -525 41.42137 -72.89822

External Links
http://www.sgpa.org [http://www.sgpa.org/colormap.pdf , Map Detail ]
http://www.ct.gov/dep/cwp/view.asp?A=2716&Q=325264

28 March 2007

American Artist Rankings

Type

Name

RS

MG

Link Wiki

Link Y!

??

artist

Edward Hopper

5

1

=

948000


artist

Fredrick Church

9

2

=

820000


artist

Frank Stella

-

3

=

829000


artist

Sargent

4

4

=

597000


artist

Bierstadt

-

5

=

111000


artist

Pollack

-

6

=

383000


artist

Jasper Johns

6

7

=

567000


artist

Rauschenberg

14

8

=

247000


artist

Inness

-

9

=

54800


artist

Thomas Cole

8

10

=

2890000


artist

Eakins

6

11

=

134000


artist

Homer

10

12

=

1460000


artist

Wyeth

-

13

=

323000


artist

Rothko

7

14

=

364000


artist

O'Keefe

15

15

=

371000


artist

Copley

16

16

=

314000


artist

James Whistler

-

17

=

279000


artist

Cassatt

2

-

=

294000


artist

Hassam

3

-

=

101000


artist

T Robinson

11

-

=

1780000

?

artist

Milton Avery

12

-

=

265000


artist

C Durand

13

-

=

164000

?








architect

Frank Lloyd Wright

6

1

=

605000


architect

P Johnson


2

=

1170000


architect

Gehry


3

=

429000


sculptor

Calder

1

4

=

70500


architect

Venturi


5

=

89500


photographer

Walker Evans


6

=

293000


photographer

Dorothea Lange


7

=

167000


sculptor

Noguchi


8

=

47400


architect

Saarinen


9

=

110000


architect

Gordon Bunshaft


10

=

27800


photographer

Leibowitz

2

-

=

36200


photographer

Richard Avedon

3

-

=

701000


photographer

Stieglitz

4

-

=

97500


other

Louis Tiffany

5

-

=

3060000


photographer

Gordon Parks

7

-

=

438000


http://gerstein.info/gps/artist-rankings.xls

27 March 2007

More on Cameras

Panasonic SV AS10 is a very Small Camera
http://reviews.cnet.com/Panasonic_SV_AS10/4505-6501_7-30556974.html
My old stuff : http://textstream.blogspot.com/2007/01/subcompact-camera-comparison.html

Letter responding to "One Number For All Your Phones" -- NY Times

Here's a letter I sent in which wasn't published:
I read with great interest the recent article about
GrandCentral.com. I just want to point out that this service closely
resembles SimulRing -- a simultaneous ring service that went out of
business several years ago. (See
http://www.thedigest.com/more/146/146-230.html ). My use of SimulRing
attempted to overcome the problem of changing your phone number that
was alluded to. I had one of my (multiple) phone numbers redirect to
the (hidden) SimulRing number and then had this call all the others. I
really liked SimulRing but was disappointed when I lost my phone
number (in addition to the service) when the company went bankrupt. It
might have been good to point out the bankruptcy risk to people
reading the article and contemplating enlisting.


Article Commented on:
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9C01EFDC1E31F936A25750C0A9619C8B63
STATE OF THE ART; One Number For All Your Phones
By DAVID POGUE
Published: March 15, 2007
If you have only one telephone with one phone number, this column won't be of
any interest to you. Skip to another article, you eccentric you.
But first, count your blessings. Millions of people have more than one phone
number these days -- home, work, cellular, hotel room, vacation home, yacht --
and with great complexity comes great hassle. You have to check multiple
answering machines. You miss calls when people try to reach you on your cell
when you're at home (or the other way around). You send around e-mail messages
at work that say, ''On Thursday from 5 to 8:30, I'll be on my cell; for the rest
of the weekend, call me at home.''....
[L2E]

26 March 2007

22 March 2007

History, Digitized (and Abridged) -- NY Times

Particularly relevant to image collection -- digitize or disappear !


History, Digitized (and Abridged)
Article Tools Sponsored By
By KATIE HAFNER
Published: March 11, 2007
THE National Steinbeck Center, at the top of Main Street in this farming community, exhibits an array of artifacts from John Steinbeck's life and works: family memorabilia, a passport from the 1960s and movie stills from ''The Grapes of Wrath.'' Downstairs, in a climate-controlled vault, is the original manuscript of ''The Pearl,'' his novella published in 1947. There is also an exuberant letter that Steinbeck wrote to a distant relative when he was a teenager, as well as rare footage of him on 16-millimeter film, introducing a 1961 movie, ''Flight.'' .....
http://select.nytimes.com/search/restricted/article?res=FA0A14FD38550C728DDDAA0894DF404482#
[clipcache]

20 March 2007

Letter in response to "Say Everything" -- NY Magazine

Below is a letter I wrote in response to the article at bottom (which was never published). Sort of the ultimate in blogging. It's a bit of the extreme in the on-line world, but maybe a hint of the future. Viz:
I enjoyed the article about the seeming irreverence for privacy displayed by young people using the Internet. The article frequently alludes to what will happen in the future when we can mine and search for all the information young people are now posting. One can imagine historians of the future combing through the vast trove of past postings on the web, looking for subtle patterns and connections between individuals that weren't at all apparent in the present. However, it is one thing for historical analysis to turn up interesting facts someone left behind about himself; it is another for it to turn up facts about someone else. In particular, what will happen with young kids posting pictures on the web of their friends in all sorts of compromising situations? Beyond the extreme case alluded to in the article of salacious images posted without consent, what are we to make of the seemingly innocent practice of party pictures, snapped in instant but posted on the web for eternity. The kids posting this information are of course unaware of the potential long-term harm they are doing to others. New rules need to be developed governing what can and can't be posted about others without their consent.


http://nymag.com/news/features/27341/
Say Everything
By Emily Nussbaum
February 12, 2007 issue of New York Magazine
As younger people reveal their private lives on the Internet, the older generation looks on with alarm and misapprehension not seen since the early days of rock and roll. The future belongs to the uninhibited.
Yeah, I am naked on the Internet," says Kitty Ostapowicz, laughing. "But I've always said I wouldn't ever put up anything I wouldn't want my mother to see."
She hands me a Bud Lite. Kitty, 26, is a bartender at Kabin in the East Village, and she is frankly adorable, with bright-red hair, a button nose, and pretty features. She knows it, too: Kitty tells me that she used to participate in "ratings communities," like "nonuglies," where people would post photos to be judged by strangers. She has a MySpace page and a Livejournal. And she tells me that the Internet brought her to New York, when a friend she met in a chat room introduced her to his Website, which linked to his friends, one of whom was a photographer. Kitty posed for that photographer in Buffalo, where she grew up, then followed him to New York. "Pretty much just wanted a change," she says. "A drastic, drastic change."...
[L2E]

18 March 2007

Letter in response to "Spam + Blogs = Trouble" -- Wired

Here's a letter I wrote in response to the article below (which was never published):
I read with great interest the recent Wired article relating to spam
blogs (dubbed splogs). The article obviously took a critical tone
towards this new nuisance. However, when the idea of manipulating
search engine rankings through creating patterns of links arose,
people initially thought it was rather humorous. It first entered the
public consciousness during the 2004 presidential election, when
manipulation of links referencing "miserable failure" brought up pages
related to George W Bush as a top-ranked item on a search (see, for
instance, http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/3298443.stm). Now,
search-engine rankings are taken more seriously and, through the
mechanism of blogs, it's possible to automatically create deceiving
link patterns. It seems that on the internet, when there's an
important, interactive service, where it's possible for people to
rapidly and anonymously create content, there's going to be a problem
-- whether it's in the form of spam e-mail, spam blogs, or
manipulation of other web 2.0 services, such as wikis. Unfortunately,
this appears to be a general aspect of the web that needs to be dealt
with more robustly.


http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/14.09/splogs.html
Spam + Blogs = Trouble
Splogs are the latest thing in online scams – and they could smother the Internet.
By Charles C. Mann
I am aware that spending a lot of time Googling yourself is kind of
narcissistic, OK? But there are situations, I would argue, when it is
efficiently – even forgivably – narcissistic. When I published a book last year,
I wanted to know what, if anything, people were saying about it. Ego-surfing was
the obvious way to do that. Which is how I stumbled across Some Title....
[L2E]

16 March 2007

Climbing Ratings - Climbing With Mike

Climbing Ratings - Climbing With Mike: Climbing Ratings - from 5.0 to Spiderman
Understand how climbs are rated and learn more about the Yosemite Decimal Rating System.

For me:

5.6 is easy yellows, up easy flat wall.
5.7 is very overhung, but with big, black holds
5.8+ is green holds, in crevice, with very hard start and end
5.8++ is xmas tree

13 March 2007

A Network-based Analysis of Polyanion-binding Proteins Utilizing Yeast Protein Arrays -- Molecular & Cellular Proteomics

Interesting work that does network analysis on top of phosphorylome data set. (Mentioned in recent talk by J Fang.)


http://www.mcponline.org/cgi/content/full/M600240-MCP200
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=16982674&dopt=Abstract
Molecular & Cellular Proteomics 5:2263-2278, 2006
doi:10.1074/mcp.M600240-MCP200 on September 18, 2006
A Network-based Analysis of Polyanion-binding Proteins Utilizing Yeast Protein Arrays
Nazila Salamat-Miller, Jianwen Fang... and C. Russell Middaugh,
The high affinity of certain cellular polyanions for many proteins (polyanion-binding proteins (PABPs)) has been demonstrated previously. It has been hypothesized that such polyanions may be involved in protein structure stabilization, stimulation of folding through chaperone-like activity, and intra- and extracellular protein transport as well as intracellular organization. The purpose of the proteomics studies reported here was to seek evidence for the idea that the nonspecific but high affinity interactions of PABPs with polyanions have a functional role in intracellular processes. Utilizing yeast protein arrays and five biotinylated cellular polyanion probes (actin, tubulin, heparin, heparan sulfate, and DNA), we identified proteins that interact with these probes and analyzed their structural and amino acid sequence requirements as well as their predicted functions in the yeast proteome. We also provide evidence for the existence of a network-like system for PABPs and their potential roles as critical hubs in intracellular behavior. This investigation takes a first step toward achieving a better understanding of the nature of polyanion-protein interactions within cells and introduces an alternative way of thinking about intracellular organization. 

[x29is]

12 March 2007

Brain Man -- 60 minutes

Amazing ability (suggested by RB).....


60 minutes
Brain Man
http://60minutes.yahoo.com/segment/44/brain_man
Wednesday, February 28, 2007
Meet Daniel Tammet, a 27 year-old math and memory wizard. He can do things with numbers that will truly amaze you. He is a savant. . . with a difference. Unlike most savants, he shows no obvious mental disability, and most importantly, he can describe his own thought process. Join correspondent Morley Safer as he explores the extraordinary life and mind of Daniel Tammet.

11 March 2007

Of mice and men: cancer gene discovery using comparative oncogenomics -- Cancer Cell

Thought the comparative angle of these two studies (mouse to human) was interesting.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=16843259&dopt=Abstract
Cancer Cell. 2006 Jul;10(1):2-4.Click here to read  Links
Of mice and men: cancer gene discovery using comparative oncogenomics.
Tomlins SA,
Chinnaiyan AM.
With the proliferation of high-throughput technologies to profile the cancer genome, methods to distinguish causal from bystander genetic events are needed. Two recent reports by Zender et al. and Kim et al. in Cell use genetically defined mouse models to serve as biological filters to mine the human cancer genome. Integration of high-resolution copy number profiles of mouse tumor models and human tumors identified cIAP1 and Yap as oncogenes in human hepatocellular carcinoma, while NEDD9 was identified as a metastasis gene in human melanoma. Together, these reports demonstrate that a comparative oncogenomics approach can identify genes causally involved in oncogenesis and metastasis.

10 March 2007

Look wise, say nothing, and grunt. Speech was given to conceal thought. [quote]

Thought it'd be nice to post this quote:
Look wise, say nothing, and grunt. Speech was given to conceal thought.
- Sir William Osler

02 March 2007

Letter in response to "Unhappy Meals" -- NY Times

Here's the final text of letter I wrote in response to the article below (which was never published):
I was impressed by Michael Pollan's recent article on the American
diet and "nutritionism" ("Unhappy Meals"). I also enjoyed reading the
letters that commented on this article in last Sunday's magazine
(February 12th issue). That being said, I felt that, taken as a
whole, the letters offered a single take on Pollan's piece. Here I try
to offer a somewhat different perspective. Pollan's central thesis --
that Americans should move away from a science-based diet and toward
eating traditional, more natural foods -- is grounded in the
underlying idea that our bodies are carefully adapted to process
nutrients in the context of whole foods. These biochemical
adaptations stem from our development in Africa millions of years
ago. Note, however, that our bodies are adapted to thrive to the age
of reproduction -- not to old age -- on natural foods. The fact that
people are living so long now is as unnatural for the human species as
Pollan's notion of artificial foods, and a number of natural foods
beneficial to the young and growing are, in fact, completely unhealthy
from a longevity perspective. Moreover, many of the traditional foods
that Pollan extols are actually products of man's manipulation; that
is, many of staples of a traditional European diet ("Mom's food") are
not foods that our ancestors would have found grazing on the African
savanna, but rather are products of the later agricultural and
industrial revolutions. In particular, milk and dairy products
obviously relate to the domestication of animals. Many of the crops
that we routinely eat, such as corn, have effectively been genetically
engineered by thousands of years of breeding to be completely
different from what they first were. Thus, the original diet that
people were biochemically designed for is a far cry from what today's
vegetarian or adherent of the Mediterranean diet would eat. Thus, can
we really claim that it is imperative to move away from the human
manipulation of food?


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/02/11/magazine/11letters.t-1.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/28/magazine/28nutritionism.t.html?ex=1327640400&en=a18a7f35515014c7&ei=5090&partner=rssuserland&emc=rss
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/28/magazine/28nutritionism.t.html?ex=157680000&en=ec2685fd6c213846&ei=5124&partner=permalink&exprod=permalink
Unhappy Meals
By MICHAEL POLLAN
Published: January 28, 2007
Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.
That, more or less, is the short answer to the supposedly incredibly complicated
and confusing question of what we humans should eat in order to be maximally
healthy. I hate to give away the game right here at the beginning of a long
essay, and I confess that I'm tempted to complicate matters in the interest of
keeping things going for a few thousand more words....
[L2E
]